HubSpot’s Katie Burke on: Beyoncé, Pet Rocks, & Storytelling

Leadership + Libations: Katie Burke

Photo courtesy of @worldwidewolfe

Before making her way to PR, it only took six weeks for Katie Burke to realize that consulting wasn’t for her. A master of storytelling, Katie channeled her inner Olivia Pope early in her career at a political communications firm. She got her MBA at Sloan, then made the jump to PR at HubSpot, before recently transitioning to a new role as the company’s Director of Talent & Culture. From preparing for HubSpot’s IPO to navigating its tremendous growth, Katie is adept at swiftly adapting to change to rally people in the right direction.

We joined forces with Young Women in Digital to sit down with Katie for a fireside chat with one goal in mind: to tackle a topic we all need help with – learning how to tell compelling stories. Katie showed us how to craft our stories in a clear, concise way, own its execution, and write our own endings.

As one person listening in nicely put it, Katie is, “the most quotable person to walk the planet.” So, rather than try to summarize our experience, here are some Katie’s most memorable quotes:

Own your Beyoncé walk, and have the confidence of Queen Bey herself.

  • “Speak in statements, not apologetic questions.”
  • “Use actions to show your stakeholders you are hungry to grow.”
  • “You don’t get to places in your career by making safe bets.”

Do your homework. Know the story you want to tell.

  • “Part of storytelling is believing you can write a different ending than those before you, and being willing to write that narrative yourself.”
  • “When communicating your ideas, speak in ‘we,’ not ‘I,’ to show that your idea provides value to the company’s best interest.”
  • “Prepare for each stakeholder’s ‘pet rock’ (i.e. special interest), and know how to address that particular perspective.”
Katie Burke

Photo Courtesy of @MsChristinaCF

Plan your approach.

  • “Think, speak, and sell in headlines. Is your idea attention grabbing? If not, think bigger about what you’re pitching.”
  • “Have a 10-slide deck. If you’re presenting your slides for the first time at a meeting, you’re doing it wrong. Rehearse! Ask for feedback early and get buy-in first from the people you need to move the project forward.”
  • “Understand why your story matters to the business and how to engage your stakeholders. If your presentation doesn’t clarify the benefits to the company, you need to revisit your approach.”
  • “Take the time, several days beforehand, to get dissenters’ buy-in and feedback; address their concerns before you pitch, then tailor your approach for them for the actual presentation.”
  • “If you have a diverse audience, pick a high-level point that everyone will be able to buy into and rally around.”
  • “Show a bias for action.”

Follow up!

  • “The next day, follow up with an email that directly states outcomes, sets expectations, and asks for validation. Then run with it.”
  • “Don’t be afraid to be specific about what you need to execute your plan.”

Invest in your own professional growth.

  • “Lead by being open to feedback and continuous improvement.”
  • “Find one thing you can do that makes you indispensable to your team and make your perspective valuable through your actions.”

REPEAT.

10 Secrets to Great Leadership from Diane Hessan

Image: Diane Hessan, Startup InstituteAfter recently leaving her 13-year gig as Communispace CEO, Diane Hessan stepped into a new role as CEO of Startup Institute, a Boston-based company dedicated to helping people transform their careers and find jobs they love. There are few CEOs as charismatic and candid as Diane, so it’s no surprise that she is a stellar leader, committed to developing top talent in Boston’s startup community.

Last Tuesday night, Diane joined Intelligent.ly’s Abbie Waite for a fireside chat about leadership with 125+ members of our community. The audience was astounded by Diane’s openness—it was like chatting with an old friend about how she casually became CEO of an international organization. In spite of immense success, Diane maintains her humility, paying forward the wisdom she’s gathered over her remarkable career. Here are her top 10 secrets to great leadership:

1. Build your A-Team: From Diane’s experience, “A-players” transform teams and help take them to the next level. Diane supports her team by spending hours interviewing key players to ensure they’re a “fit,” build rapport, and learn what matters to them.

2. Being honest ≄ being mean: Leadership is about being direct and objective. Sometimes you need to have difficult conversations for the good of the company, but it doesn’t have to be mean. People value the truth, especially when it helps them in the long run.

3. There’s no such thing as, “I’m not a leader yet:” You can be a leader at any level. Leadership is more about empowering others to lead than getting them to follow.

4. Serendipity: Most of your life is the product of a few “aha” moments. Diane keeps these tucked away and remembered, and they shape how she leads her team.

Image: Abbie Waite, Diane Hessan5. Listen more than you speak: For her first month at Startup Institute, Diane did almost nothing but listen. She asked each team in the organization about their unique challenges, then began to formulate solutions.

6. You can’t do it all: You may be a leader, but that doesn’t mean you can do everything well. Instead, choose a few things you can do really well to impact your team, and focus on that!

7. Don’t keep secrets: Diane believes in being open and transparent with her team. Two weeks into her new CEO position, she laid out all the numbers for her team, a shocking and unprecedented move. This small action went a long way in helping her team understand how they contribute, building trust, and reducing anxiety.

8. Keep the conversation going: Leadership is all about having a continued conversation, and you never stop trying to raise the bar. Ask your team, “if you could wave a magic wand, what would this team be doing?” and get everyone involved in the vision.

9. You’re leading PEOPLE: Well, duh. But we truly can’t overstate this enough. Everyone’s different, and human beings want to know that they matter and that you’re thinking of them. They need to know what the team vision is and that it’s okay to screw up sometimes.

10. Embrace question marks: In rapidly growing organizations, scaling leadership is just as important as scaling the company itself. This oftentimes means not knowing all the answers, but rather having a diverse team who you can trust to have the answers you don’t have.

Want more great leadership pointers like these? Attend our next Leadership + Libations event OR learn more about Intelligent.ly Exchange!

 

Leaders love feedback

SpeakerSpotlight

Cory von WallensteinIntelligent.ly Exchange’s fifth cohort kicked off with a bang when our partner, Cory von Wallenstein arrived as our first guest speaker last week. Cory was an instrumental leader at Dyn for six years, and recently launched a new startup, Adored, a customer loyalty app that’s revolutionizing the mobile rewards experience. Cory’s aptitude for embracing failure as a learning experience has helped him to become a model leader. The sixty minutes we had with him flew by, so here’s his advice in a nutshell:

Enjoy failing, enjoy learning: Cory’s humility in spite of his success stems from his failures. Instead of shying away from his mistakes, Cory has embraced them, leveraging what he’s learned to become a stronger and more impactful leader. You may be wondering why this guy is so gung-ho about failure. The answer’s simple—feedback. After every conversation with his team, Cory requests feedback so he can become the best version of himself, both personally and professionally. Rather than playing the blame game, he points the finger inward and asks himself how he can do better by his organization and his team.

CVW Fireside ChatI’m too busy” is the ultimate fallacy: According to this HBR article, the majority of managers “squander their time in all sorts of ineffective activities.” Leading is all about the people, Cory says, so it is a leader’s job to engage the team—no matter how busy they are. This means being crystal clear about what the priorities are, understanding what motivates each team member and how they define success, and not allowing procrastination or distraction to get in the way. Aligning their team with high-priority goals and helping each person understand how their role connects to the shared vision is the most important role effective managers share. Cory urges leaders to make time to discuss with each person their version of success and concrete steps they can take to achieve their goals.

And his actionable advice that everyone can do tomorrow to be a more effective leader?: “Have an impromptu 1:1 conversation with a team member about what drives them and how they define success. Open the door to more dialogue.”

Why You Need a Personal
Board of Directors

Sydney Atkins MasonWhy we all need a Personal Board of Directors and how to develop one.

Strong leaders know better than anyone that no one achieves anything alone. A support system is instrumental to achieving team goals, propelling individual career growth, and perhaps most importantly, maintaining sanity.

At a recent Exchange fireside chat, Sydney Atkins Mason, Investment Advisor at Goldman Sachs, shared why her “Personal Board of Directors” has been the most priceless weapon in her professional arsenal. It can be tricky to assemble the right network when you’re not sure what to look for, but Sydney credits her wealth of success to her relationships with three major people – her mentor, sponsor, and coach:

Mentor: Your mentor is the John Keating to your Dead Poets Society, the Socrates to your Plato, the Hagrid to your Harry. A mentor will never dole out the same piece of advice to two different people because to your mentor, you are a beautiful and unique snowflake, with triumphs and challenges that distinguish you from other snowflakes. A mentor helps you to evolve over time. This relationship is frequently a two-way street; the mentor is a catalyst for mentee growth, and mentors get the “warm fuzzies” from helping someone out.

Sponsor: Unlike a mentor relationship, a sponsor relationship is linear; your sponsor will catapult your success–if you play your cards right. Your sponsor can help you move forward in your career by publicly vouching for you, endorsing your skills and strengths, or even open doors you didn’t know existed. This person does this purely because they believe in you and, often, there is no way to repay them. This should be someone you deeply respect and admire, who can become your ally as you evolve in your career. Your success is your sponsor’s success, but be sure you pay it forward and become a sponsor to someone else. Don’t get greedy. You don’t want to be that guy.

Coach: A coach is your sounding board for any seemingly “stupid (functional) question” you have. Need help using the company database? Ask your coach. Having trouble understanding some jargon? Ask your coach. With your coach, all your questions are valid concerns. Your coach is who you rely on for your most immediate and basic job-related concerns.

Look around at who you know today and whether there are people in your midst who might naturally fill these roles for you. Have an open conversation, letting them know why you appreciate their advice and what your ask is, but most importantly, invest the time in developing those relationships. Now go!

Justine’s GIANT LIST of Email Marketing Resources

Justine Jordan - looking fineFollowing her super useful class on Email Marketing at Intelligent.ly (see deck below), Justine offered to share her GIANT LIST of Email Marketing Resources that she’s compiled during her years on the job. Use wisely. Share liberally.  Justine Jordan is Director of Marketing at Litmus, where she leads content marketing, customer education and research initiatives. She’s massively passionate about email marketing, and hates being called a spammer.

Click here to see Justine's class at Intelligent.lyEmail Marketing – getting started and building an opt-in email list:

Gems from the Litmus blog that every email marketer should read:

Justine’s top 17 go-to sources for topnotch advice (in no particular order):

  1. http://www.email-marketing-reports.com/
  2. http://www.campaignmonitor.com/blog/
  3. http://stylecampaign.com/blog/
  4. http://www.emaildesignreview.com/
  5. http://emailwizardry.nightjar.com.au/
  6. http://www.mediapost.com/publications/email-insider/
  7. http://www.clickz.com/category/email
  8. http://blog.wordtothewise.com/
  9. http://blog.deliverability.com/
  10. http://blog.indiemark.com/
  11. http://emailcritic.com/
  12. http://marketingland.com/library/email-marketing-news
  13. http://www.emailmarketingrules.com/
  14. http://www.alchemyworx.com/emailworx/
  15. http://blog.emailexperience.org/
  16. http://emailblog.eu/
  17. http://www.emailmonday.com/

Get inspired – email examples to spark your creativity:

Digital marketing sites that you should know (they frequently email tips too):

Email Software Providers’ frequently post great tips:  

Justine admits that the blogs of her competitors ARE worth looking at!

THANK YOU JUSTINE! We also encourage following her rants and raves at @meladorri